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Old 02-29-2020, 12:35 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Some of those prefabricated sheds actually do look good. I would be OK living in one in a lot instead of living in an apartment as I currently do.

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Old 02-29-2020, 03:23 AM   #32 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redpoint5
I question everything about the homebuilding industry. It boggles my mind why most homes are a bespoke work rather than built from a large number of existing plans. Then, why are we still cutting lumber and nailing it together? There's got to be a better way were either the frame is printed on site, or the materials are all precisely measured and cut at a factory, and then Ikea assembled on site.
In the 1920s Bucky Fuller talked about having a car handbuilt in the driveway as an analogy. His Dymaxion bathroom and houses were his response.

I built and operated Oregon Dome's first factory in 1980. Flat-panel kits that went up in one day. The forms were built to 1/64th" and the pieces were cut to 1/32nd". Across a 40ft circle they were accurate to 1/8th".

I worked for two roofing truss companies 40 years apart. There was quite a difference, I mentioned the laser patterns, but I was an estimator and used CAD software that automated layouts. I don't like engineered trusses though, they create unusable space.

I completed a 3D model of the cyberhouse and emailed it off. There're others who will see it first, but I should be able to meet my self-imposed 24-post deadline.
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Old 02-29-2020, 04:28 AM   #33 (permalink)
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It seems they can make trusses that leave usable space, but they cost more: https://www.askthebuilder.com/roof-t...e-bonus-space/

Does this post mean anything? Thinking about building a geodesic dome? Don't.
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Old 02-29-2020, 06:23 AM   #34 (permalink)
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It is after 03! Why am I still awake?!

I believe that we discussed 3d-printed homes before. I ran across a video, watched a few more on the subject, and this has as much information as any of them--not nearly enough. Does this meet building codes for anywhere in the U.S. [with regulations]? How much does it cost? When can I get one? How are these earthquake and tropical-storm resistant?

I previously found some videos that sounded like they were supposed to show people building sheds, but they just bought one from Home Depot. In one series of a half-dozen videos, Home Depot gave a girl a shed kit and other supplies, and she built it with her dad.

It was the hardest thing that she ever did!

A glorified dog house?!

I feel like building one from scratch and just saying "I enjoyed it."

However, I would feel obligated to keep a list of things that went wrong.

Undoubtedly, that would be a long list.

I like these videos. This carpenter in Norway started building small sheds and he can assemble one in two hours, although he hardly gives any other information. He said that business was slow until he started making these sheds and I believe that he said this was his most popular product.

They fit in his van, which makes delivery easy.

All that he says is they are about 30 square feet, but like Kevin's list of cheap home improvements, maybe this is something that I could do to earn money:
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Old 02-29-2020, 12:59 PM   #35 (permalink)
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It seems they can make trusses that leave usable space, but they cost more: https://www.askthebuilder.com/roof-t...e-bonus-space/
Those exist. They're called attic trusses or something. Can't provide as big a space as the raftered attic in the picture. The slanted ceiling part is [more] limited.
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Does this post mean anything? Thinking about building a geodesic dome? Don't.
Anecdotal. Paint isn't a roofing material. An engineer isn't an architect. No oculus = no ventilation.

I've actually seen one worse example. It's gone now too.
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Old 03-01-2020, 10:34 AM   #36 (permalink)
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Have you looked into tiny houses? They have the same idea of skirting around zoning. They're also generally DIY and have to deal with issues like getting utilities to remote land (it's not cheap).
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Old 03-01-2020, 10:59 PM   #37 (permalink)
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There are plenty of people telling how they built their tiny house ridiculously cheaply, but they got all or almost all of their materials for free. They really like using pallets for siding. There is one for free in my area. How far will that get me?

I searched for free pallets in my ZIP and just found some webpages telling me contradictory things like "It is pointless to check supermarkets for free pallets, they always have pallet recycling programs" and "Check your local supermarkets!"

Another page said that pallets used to transport food often have food spills, which invite mold.

If one wanted pallets, they might as well try to find some for free, but as popular as pallet crafts appear on Pinterest, plus people up here burning them for heat, I wonder how many I would find.

Okay. Let's say that you find so many pallets that you can use them for the exterior and interior walls, floor, ceiling, and roof, where do you get 2x4s cheaply?

I did not find anything, but I did not spend hours looking, like I did for pallets.

Someone on reddit said to find companies that do stone cabinets, they go through tons of crates made with good wood. Someone else said that dismantling crates is too labor-intensive.

One of those other pages said that it is often worth paying for them instead of scavenging. Someone mentioned all the time and energy involved in dismantling them.

Here is a twelve-minute video of a guy dismantling a pallet using a four-pound sledge hammer, a claw hammer, and scrap wood. Seriously, that is it! I watched other videos and they seemed to take much more time and used special tools.


I was trying to wrap up this mess and do something productive--or fun--and was closing down the rest of the tabs that I had opened when I saw Izzy Swan's video:
He made a tool out of wood and dismantled a pallet in 2.5 minutes, but how long does it take to remove the nails?

If it takes ninety seconds to remove the nails then this is three times as fast as the other video.

That changes things, but as much as I love saving old things, there is definitely an argument for purchasing new materials and saving a ridiculous amount of time.

So, five pallets in one hour and lots of exercise. This guy waited for his wife to take a nap to start hammering pallets apart. He mentioned wearing a mask "since pallet sawdust isnít thought to be part of a healthy diet." I think that it took him an hour and a half to dismantle one pallet and then he gave up, bought new wood, and "Distressed it." https://www.younghouselove.com/how-m...odchuck-chuck/

I never understand that, like buying jeans that look like they should have been thrown away.

This post says "It takes about 7 or 8 pallet boards to get 10 square feet."

Seriously?! Let's say that you have a 10' cube with doors and shutters made from pallet wood. If we say 9'8" it would (more or less) average out to 10'.

That is 560.67 square feet for the interior and 533.89 square feet for the roof and exterior walls. That totals 1,094.56 square feet. At 7.5 pallets per 10 square feet, it would require 821 pallets!

If you dismantle five pallets an hour it would take 164 hours or four forty-hour weeks and four hours. [Or fifty-five hours with Izzy Swan's method]

I suddenly cannot find tiny houses built with pallet wood siding--just tiny houses built out of whole pallets, like this, made from "just" 80 pallets (100. Why does everyone lie?!):
Quote:
A 250 square foot 'Pallet House' requires 100 recycled pallets nailed and lifted into place by 4-5 people using hand tools in under a week.

No windows, doors, or insulation.

Five people working full-time for a week for this?

"To find free pallets, a quick internet search should bring up anything you need."

I have been looking for two and a half hours!

Quote:
[B]uilding with repurposed materials drastically increased the amount of time it took to build the tiny house. If I were to have built with all new materials I could have carefully planned out my list and done just one or two trips to the store with a truck. Instead I spent many days searching the internet. This was very time consuming. I had [a volunteer] help me find materials. She spent about 25 hours on this.
Quote:
[T]he average power drill gets used for only half an hour in its lifetime.
I have used both my drill and my electric screwdriver more than that and I am confident that Dad's drill has seen a great deal of use.

I screwed together a fence for the back yard. It took forever!

Quote:
In total about 40 volunteers helped out and the total hours that have gone into the house so far is 225.
Seriously?!

I found a dozen pallet companies in Phoenix and none of them post current prices. Do they fluctuate that badly?

Alibaba shows bulk pallets for about $5 each, although I do not have any idea how much shipping would be. Eighty, like you supposedly need for that weird shack, would cost $400, but it actually says 100, so $500.

If you made the 10' cube requiring 821 pallets it would cost $4,105 for 100 square feet.

This post says: "Pallet Prices for B Grade Recycled Wood Pallets - $5.00 - $7.00."

Instead of getting volunteers to repurpose used materials, would it make more sense to get volunteers for a fund raiser to buy new materials, if either way the materials are used for charity?

How bad is it that pallets go to the dump, at least if they are heat-treated?

[What are you supposed to do with chemically-treated pallets anyway?]
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Old 03-02-2020, 02:26 AM   #38 (permalink)
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Apartment-over-garage kits would not pass regulations

The manufacturer stated:
Quote:
This building is engineered as a utility structure (risk category 1) which is very different from a residential building (risk category 2). The engineering calculations included with this building package will not meet requirement, and therefore not pass code for (or inspection as) a living space.
Other people commented that carbon monoxide and fire would easily travel from the garage to the loft.

I had figured that I would need to have an architect modify the plans to include plumbing and electricity, but it sounds like far more would be required.
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Old 03-02-2020, 10:55 AM   #39 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xist View Post
The manufacturer stated:


Other people commented that carbon monoxide and fire would easily travel from the garage to the loft.
That's why there is 5/8 firewall sheetrock, the corners and seams are taped.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xist View Post
I had figured that I would need to have an architect modify the plans to include plumbing and electricity, but it sounds like far more would be required.
Most jurisdictions have an option for owner designed/built housing using an ICBO cheat sheet listing minimum materials.second floor additions self engineered are really overbuilt.

I have done some owner occupied design and building. Pissy part was forgetting to bribe the inspector.

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Old 03-02-2020, 01:32 PM   #40 (permalink)
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The kits that I saw are mostly just hundreds of wooden boards, assembled like Lincoln Logs. The pictures of the interior and exterior just show these boards.
Installing drywall should not be a problem, but the boards slowly shrink over the first year, settling a couple of inches per floor.
How would you install drywall before it finished settling?
Any place requiring 2x6 construction would prohibit this, they are 2.5x4.5. 3x5s?

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