Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > General Efficiency Discussion
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-17-2017, 10:31 AM   #41 (permalink)
EV convert
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 7,714

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)

Snow flake - '11 Nissan Leaf SL
SUV
90 day: 124.63 mpg (US)
Thanks: 178
Thanked 2,428 Times in 1,889 Posts
There is no coolant down in the rod and main bearings where most of the oil leaks through and goes into the sump. The 75lb crank shaft in my engine and loe lower part with the mains webbing and main caps would have to be warmed by its own friction or heat absorbed from the oil.
I already did some calculations to heat the oil in around 20 minutes from 0F to 100F there is no need to leave it plugged in all night.

__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, corvette gen 5 front brakes, 1LE drive shaft, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
2011 leaf SL, white, portable 240v CHAdeMO, trailer hitch, new batt as of 2014.
  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 01-21-2017, 11:27 AM   #42 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,337

2004 CTD - '04 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT
Team Cummins
90 day: 19.36 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,334
Thanked 675 Times in 513 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xist View Post
You use a block heater in Texas?
Engine runs at about 187F. Oil is above 200F.

A block heater isn't about being able to start so much as it is about reducing wear at startup. The shorter the time to op temp, the better. Same with synthetic oil changed at factory interval. If the goal is longest life as well as reduced fuel burn, then year round use pays for itself.

On a 45F day a little rice burner is almost warned by the end of the block. Without a load on it (and without a grill block or below 40F) a pickup diesel may not ever warm up on a day of errand running.

What wastes fuel on a per mile basis is a double penalty on a medium duty diesel. It isn't at all optimal for solo passenger errand running. Without a 10k trailer on the back, it's outside design parameters.
__________________
2004.0 DODGE Ram QC/LB 2500 2WD/NV-5600 305/555 ISB. 7,940-lb. Stock. 200,000 miles/5000-hrs @ 40-mph average.
1990 35' Silver Streak TT 7,900-lb.
11-cpm solo & 19-cpm towing; 21-mpg average past 54k-miles
Sold: 1983 Silver Streak 3411
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2017, 12:25 AM   #43 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ivins UT
Posts: 212

the green machine :P - '97 Jeep Grand Cherokee ZJ
90 day: 20.92 mpg (US)

Thee s10 - '00 Chevy S10
90 day: 24.27 mpg (US)

Freedom - '05 Kawasaki Ninja 250EX
90 day: 75.55 mpg (US)
Thanks: 2
Thanked 21 Times in 19 Posts
I've been wanting to try using a insulating coating called nansulate as a insulation for my engine. It's supposed to create a r-13 insulating coating on the engine to hold in the heat. I'd like to coat the intake first and go back to the engine to try to keep track of its temperature to avoid overheating.

If you can keep the engine temperature down by controlling the intake temperature I believe it could go towards improving the engines overall efficiency.

Here's the product I'm looking at Heat Shield EPX4 Insulation Coating | Industrial Nanotech Inc.

I'm also wanting to see about putting a water cooler setup in line of the EGR to cool the gases and also see if I can use it to "inject" around 7 gallons of water into the engine in place of water injection system!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2017, 03:53 PM   #44 (permalink)
NHB
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Finland
Posts: 64
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by stovie View Post
I've been wanting to try using a insulating coating called nansulate as a insulation for my engine. It's supposed to create a r-13 insulating coating on the engine to hold in the heat. I'd like to coat the intake first and go back to the engine to try to keep track of its temperature to avoid overheating.

If you can keep the engine temperature down by controlling the intake temperature I believe it could go towards improving the engines overall efficiency.
I don't get the idea. Why would you like to insulate the intake?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2017, 07:36 PM   #45 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ivins UT
Posts: 212

the green machine :P - '97 Jeep Grand Cherokee ZJ
90 day: 20.92 mpg (US)

Thee s10 - '00 Chevy S10
90 day: 24.27 mpg (US)

Freedom - '05 Kawasaki Ninja 250EX
90 day: 75.55 mpg (US)
Thanks: 2
Thanked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by NHB View Post
I don't get the idea. Why would you like to insulate the intake?
From what I've seen the intake on many cars are around 80 degrees difference between the iat and the ambient air which causes higher combustion temperatures, when I start coating the engine it will be summer so I need to avoid overheating!! And from what I understand a r-13 insulation value takes about 13 hours for the inside temperature to work its way out, so you could put a block heater in and have it maintain temp better!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2017, 09:24 PM   #46 (permalink)
EV convert
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 7,714

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)

Snow flake - '11 Nissan Leaf SL
SUV
90 day: 124.63 mpg (US)
Thanks: 178
Thanked 2,428 Times in 1,889 Posts
If the vehicle has a cold air intake the air intake temperature is usually with in 1 or 2 degrees of out side the vehicle. If some ones car is running intake air 80 above the out side temperature it's by design, or a warm air intake.
Higher combustion temperature gives better efficiency.
__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, corvette gen 5 front brakes, 1LE drive shaft, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
2011 leaf SL, white, portable 240v CHAdeMO, trailer hitch, new batt as of 2014.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2017, 11:34 PM   #47 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ivins UT
Posts: 212

the green machine :P - '97 Jeep Grand Cherokee ZJ
90 day: 20.92 mpg (US)

Thee s10 - '00 Chevy S10
90 day: 24.27 mpg (US)

Freedom - '05 Kawasaki Ninja 250EX
90 day: 75.55 mpg (US)
Thanks: 2
Thanked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by oil pan 4 View Post
If the vehicle has a cold air intake the air intake temperature is usually with in 1 or 2 degrees of out side the vehicle. If some ones car is running intake air 80 above the out side temperature it's by design, or a warm air intake.
Higher combustion temperature gives better efficiency.
Using a infrared digital thermometer the intake on my jeep sits around 197 degrees f, and I'm sure that transfers to the in going air quite a bit! Looking into it it seems that the colder the air intake is the more thermally efficient the vehicle is. A lot of the people I see getting the best fe live in places that are regularly in the teens to below zero, but they can't maintain engine temperature so they have to use a intake heater!! After dropping the intake to as low a temperature as possible you'll need to insulate the engine to retain as much heat as possible because it takes longer to heat up, dropping efficiency!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2017, 12:06 AM   #48 (permalink)
ScanGauge <3
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: CID
Posts: 362

Winter Sacrifice - '96 Subaru Outback
Subaru
90 day: 25.34 mpg (US)
Thanks: 209
Thanked 127 Times in 89 Posts
Volumetric efficiency and fuel efficiency ain't the same thing.
__________________



Best tank (so far): 32 MPG
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2017, 05:07 AM   #49 (permalink)
EV convert
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 7,714

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)

Snow flake - '11 Nissan Leaf SL
SUV
90 day: 124.63 mpg (US)
Thanks: 178
Thanked 2,428 Times in 1,889 Posts
Unfortunately gas engines don't get the best efficiency with cold air.
On paper it might look like cold air is more efficient in a gasoline engine. It is if you want to make more power cold air is better. If you want efficiency warmer air is better.

There have been a member or 2 on here that tested warn up times with a cold air intake versus warmed air intske and it cut warm up times by a 2 or 3 minutes.
__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, corvette gen 5 front brakes, 1LE drive shaft, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
2011 leaf SL, white, portable 240v CHAdeMO, trailer hitch, new batt as of 2014.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2017, 09:06 AM   #50 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ivins UT
Posts: 212

the green machine :P - '97 Jeep Grand Cherokee ZJ
90 day: 20.92 mpg (US)

Thee s10 - '00 Chevy S10
90 day: 24.27 mpg (US)

Freedom - '05 Kawasaki Ninja 250EX
90 day: 75.55 mpg (US)
Thanks: 2
Thanked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by oil pan 4 View Post
Unfortunately gas engines don't get the best efficiency with cold air.
On paper it might look like cold air is more efficient in a gasoline engine. It is if you want to make more power cold air is better. If you want efficiency warmer air is better.

There have been a member or 2 on here that tested warn up times with a cold air intake versus warmed air intske and it cut warm up times by a 2 or 3 minutes.
I understand the concept and have also seen others success with warm air intake, but I never liked the power drop so I put a cold air on my s10.(I got it off eBay for $35👍&#128077 After I did I got a 3mpg improvement and no longer have to downshift when going up steep hills in my area, so I guess it depends on your situation and location?!? I'd also like to see about getting a torqued cam and jumping the compression ratio to around 14.5-1 at which point I'd run e100 only!!(I've seen many people get to around 14.5 compression ratio and get as much as 25% improvement on ethanol! Though that's generally all you can use at that compression ratio!!)

  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com