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Old 11-03-2019, 04:34 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gumby79 View Post
I had 2 options with my Allison 6sp install.
1 GM style, soft and squishy 1-5(1stOD) 5-6 locked shift
2 Allison style, 1-2,lock 3-6 locked shifts
GM went this way for a soft fill not longevity or controlling excessive heat.
Allison, went for longevity @ up to 26k lbs.
Ether way the TCM adjusts the apply and release solenoids timing(when) and rate (how much time it takes each) to make smooth shifts independent of controlling line pressure. Uncontrollable line pressure WILL destroy the trans with extremely violent shifts as timing and rate alone are inadequate.

Read up on how your particular trans controlls shift firmness. A shift kit may be the better option.
Thank you for all the great info, I really appreciate it! How exactly will my pressure control solenoid modifications destroy the transmission though? It now shifts noticeably firmer than stock, but I wouldnít say that it is shifting violently at all. And I have stiff polyurethane engine and trans mounts, so if it was shifting hard enough to break thinks I would think I would feel it.

Also, how quickly would you expect these modifications to destroy the trans? I have been driving it about 6K miles this way and everything still seems fine as far as I can tell. If something was going to break from the hard shifts I would think it would have by now, but please correct me if I am wrong.

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Old 11-04-2019, 11:26 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Like I posted earlier: get a fluid analysis done.

That will tell exactly what is in the fluid, like band material, chunks of gears with serial numbers, bananas, whatever.

IF there's nothing abnormal then you're not destroying your transmission no matter what anyone says.

You can either worry or be proactive.
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Old 11-05-2019, 05:26 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Piotrsko View Post
Like I posted earlier: get a fluid analysis done.

That will tell exactly what is in the fluid, like band material, chunks of gears with serial numbers, bananas, whatever.

IF there's nothing abnormal then you're not destroying your transmission no matter what anyone says.

You can either worry or be proactive.
Thank you. That's a great idea, I will look into that. However, I am reasonably sure I am not doing damage to my transmission simply by raising the line pressure, although I could be wrong and it would be nice to know for sure. I do not normally shift it with the converter locked, I only did a few times.

So the problem is if I have the fluid analyzed and everything is okay (which is what I would expect), I still don't know if leaving the converter locked while it shifts is harmful because I don't normally do that. I would have to allow it to shift locked for a few thousand miles and have the fluid analyzed again to know that. And I don't know what kind of damage could be done if I regularly shift with a locked converter and I would really rather not ruin the transmission I just bought and installed in my only functional car.

Also, I plan to install a magnetic inline filter because I recently replaced the magnetic drain plug with a temp sensor for my new transmission temp gauge, which is probably bad since these transmissions don't have a real filter. I am not sure how that would affect the fluid analysis though.
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Old 11-06-2019, 11:46 AM   #14 (permalink)
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If the fluid is ok, that means your current process DOESN'T creat more noticeable wear, so you can continue the process with the exception of part fatigue which is random. It also gives you a baseline to compare future problems. I expect the changes to be dramatic, as it was in powerglides. Back in the day, if you got a whole summer out of racing one, you were happy as can be.

All the magnet will do is attract steel particles, which while are abrasive, and just means you are failing the steel parts: gears, rings, bearings. Aluminum and clutch pack particles will still fail bearings. The best is a filter in the cooler circuit.
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Old 11-07-2019, 02:03 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piotrsko View Post
If the fluid is ok, that means your current process DOESN'T creat more noticeable wear, so you can continue the process with the exception of part fatigue which is random. It also gives you a baseline to compare future problems. I expect the changes to be dramatic, as it was in powerglides. Back in the day, if you got a whole summer out of racing one, you were happy as can be.

All the magnet will do is attract steel particles, which while are abrasive, and just means you are failing the steel parts: gears, rings, bearings. Aluminum and clutch pack particles will still fail bearings. The best is a filter in the cooler circuit.
Very helpful, thank you for the great info. So if I understood correctly, boosting the pressures probably isnít doing significant damage since the trans is still alive and healthy (as far as I can tell) after 7K miles of running this way. Is that correct? Thanks
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:09 AM   #16 (permalink)
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As I constantly say: if the fluid is the original color, has no new smells, particularly burnt smells, and doesn't feel gritty or have suspended particles, you are wearing it out at a typical rate.

From my experience, it can change in a weekend but I do evil things to them.
To me: as it wears it goes from magenta to red to brown.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:16 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piotrsko View Post
As I constantly say: if the fluid is the original color, has no new smells, particularly burnt smells, and doesn't feel gritty or have suspended particles, you are wearing it out at a typical rate.

From my experience, it can change in a weekend but I do evil things to them.
To me: as it wears it goes from magenta to red to brown.
The fluid looks and smells fine to me after 7K miles of running it this way. However, as I said, I donít shift with a locked converter. If I consistently shifted with a locked converter, the fluid may be dirty by now. For that matter, the trans may be dead by now for all I know.
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Old 11-08-2019, 04:54 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Without doing the research on your specific transmission no one can answer the questions about your specific unit. You're 7000 miles and no issues showing up sounds like the trial-and-error method has shown you to be on the right track. I gave the examples of my Allison Transmission because it has both configurations available torq converter locked and unlocked shifting

GM Chevy use the unlocked+pressure control. Medium-duty Freightliner Mercedes and other such medium and heavy-duty manufacturers use a locked shift pattern from 2nd gear through 6th Gear by controlling line pressure, engagement, and release rates on three separate solenoids to adjust shift firmness, and prevent RPM flares AKA slipping the clutchs

Bottom line If your transmission is anything like mine, not being able to control the line pressure + locked shifting may be problematic trial and error will rule that out by surviving thousands of miles, or confirm that it is a problem by wetting the bed in short order. You reported no additional abrasiveness to the shifts having bypass the pressure control and manually locking the torque converter and that it is a very small sample size. Get a bigger a sample, then report back. Blackstone fluid analysis is about 20 bucks if it's wet they can test it. Cheap insurance and a way to test it without making it fully wet the bed

I apologize I evidently came off negative. I do not have experience with your unit I do however have experience with medium light-duty applications. As far as your experiment has been explained sounds like you're on the right track and things are looking good. And it sounds like it's time to move on to phase two of testing locked + no pressure control. I would run the experiment the other direction however locked with pressure control monitoring the tcm's pressure readings to see if it is adjusting to compensate for a locked shift then run a phase 3 disabling bypassing the pressure control system
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:07 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gumby79 View Post
Without doing the research on your specific transmission no one can answer the questions about your specific unit. You're 7000 miles and no issues showing up sounds like the trial-and-error method has shown you to be on the right track. I gave the examples of my Allison Transmission because it has both configurations available torq converter locked and unlocked shifting

GM Chevy use the unlocked+pressure control. Medium-duty Freightliner Mercedes and other such medium and heavy-duty manufacturers use a locked shift pattern from 2nd gear through 6th Gear by controlling line pressure, engagement, and release rates on three separate solenoids to adjust shift firmness, and prevent RPM flares AKA slipping the clutchs

Bottom line If your transmission is anything like mine, not being able to control the line pressure + locked shifting may be problematic trial and error will rule that out by surviving thousands of miles, or confirm that it is a problem by wetting the bed in short order. You reported no additional abrasiveness to the shifts having bypass the pressure control and manually locking the torque converter and that it is a very small sample size. Get a bigger a sample, then report back. Blackstone fluid analysis is about 20 bucks if it's wet they can test it. Cheap insurance and a way to test it without making it fully wet the bed

I apologize I evidently came off negative. I do not have experience with your unit I do however have experience with medium light-duty applications. As far as your experiment has been explained sounds like you're on the right track and things are looking good. And it sounds like it's time to move on to phase two of testing locked + no pressure control. I would run the experiment the other direction however locked with pressure control monitoring the tcm's pressure readings to see if it is adjusting to compensate for a locked shift then run a phase 3 disabling bypassing the pressure control system
Thank you for all the info, I really appreciate it. I tried researching how this trans controls operates and controls pressures, but try finding info on how Honda BMXA/SLXA transmissions operate. It's not easy, there isn't much info out there.

I am feeling pretty good about not having pressure control after 7K trouble free miles, fluid still clean, and a seemingly healthy trans. I haven't felt any slipping, slow shifts, or anything else disturbing, so that's probably a good sign too. I feel like if something terrible was going to happen it would have by now.

The problem with letting it shift locked with pressure control is that the PCM apparently keeps the pressure to the TCC low enough that the it either won't apply or will only apply partially (slips) under certain conditions (like when stopped, in 1st gear, shifter in D3 or 2, under load, etc), so I have to keep the pressure control solenoids disabled for my manual lockup to function correctly. Although maybe 1 of the solenoids is to control the TCC pressure and the other is to control pressure during shifts. I'm not sure, I'd have to try disabling one solenoid at a time. My trans doesn't have pressure sensors, so I can't monitor the pressures.

As I said this is my only functional car at the moment and I am afraid of doing damage and being without a functional car if I ruin the trans in this one, so I am likely not going to make a habit of shifting with a locked converter until I get at least 1 of my other 2 cars running so I have something to drive while I fix this one if I break it.

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