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Old 08-28-2018, 12:51 AM   #2591 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by All Darc View Post
Why not connect many solar panels together in series (not parallel) to combine voltage, adding enough panels to reach 110/120 volts or 220/240 volts for residential use?
I know inversors not just convert voltage but also convert direct current to alternate current to allow energy be used for homes or go to the grid. But maybe inversors could be simpler or cheaper if they needed just to convert dirrect to alternate current and not also convert voltage.

If one panel fail, or if a cell of one panel fail, in a series connected panels, the entire system lose power, stop working, am I correct ?
If one or two panels get shadow, while the other still get sun (due some object making shadow), would the voltage be altered? I bet not.

Well, did I sounded idiot ?
No, it's a good question. Solar panels are sometimes connected in series, and it saves on wiring and loss due to voltage drop. The problem is the whole system is limited to whatever the output of the lowest wattage panel is, so shading becomes a problem.

With parallel designs, there are more wires to connect the panels and more loss due to voltage drop, but wattage can vary between panels without affecting output of the others.

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Old 08-28-2018, 01:26 AM   #2592 (permalink)
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Panels are a most always connected in serries for really high DC voltage when used with grid tie.
For my first solar power install I was going to run panels in serries for about 572 volts DC open current making about 400 to 450 volts DC under load.

Grid tie inverters cost about 10 cents per watt of capacity.
No need to reinvent the wheel.

If one cell in the serries gets shaded the array output will just about be cut in half.

If the panels are in parallel, say running to a 48v inverter one or 2 panels getting shade won't effect the entire array much.

But the cost per watt of 48v inverters is much higher than 100 to 600 volt inverters.
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Old 08-28-2018, 10:45 AM   #2593 (permalink)
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I wonder if there is a software to calculate the risk of shading, partial shading, by analysing the edifications near, or even not so near but large building in the residential area in a 2 square km block.
I saw a image of a huge store with roof covered with solar panels, but the shadow of a tall building was over 50% or so of the panels in a given hour of the day.
The software could use google maps satelite photos as reference.


Efficience advances :

https://electrek.co/2018/02/17/solar...film-monoperc/

Thin solar film with 25,1% efficience. If it get cheaper than actual chinse modules it's good news : https://www.prnewswire.com/news-rele...300592510.html


Bad news about Sunpower's Maxeon cells in promotions. SunPower website tells that the low cost cells selled in China are rejected lots from SunPower that somehow went to China and are being selled buy unauthorized dealers.

Somehow went to China ? I bet they selled it to China, or some corrupt employer of SunPower gattered the bad lot and sold.
The price of real SUnPower cells are quite expensive, and the price of the last 24,3% efficience advance cell they created are the double of that.

:-(

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Old 08-28-2018, 02:00 PM   #2594 (permalink)
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A fair number of solar PV installations are micro inverters and are connected to 240V AC at the panel. That is how they are in my system - three strings, of no more than 12 panels each. Each string uses a 40A (I think) 240V breaker.

The most expensive way to generate power is nuclear - this is why almost none are being built. Land based wind is the cheapest. Sea based wind is more than land, but now with the 12MW turbines, the cost of sea based systems has come down quite a bit.

Decommissioning the Pilgrim nuclear power plant in Plymouth MA will cost <b>$1,000,000,000 - $One Billion</b> and take (at least) about a decade. They said they will store the waste in New Mexico. But I think it will be staying on site in dry casks - that last only about 100 years. Who will pay in the long run?

Entergy Agrees To Sell Plymouth Nuclear Plant To Handle Its Decommissioning | Bostonomix

43-Year-Old Pilgrim Nuclear Plant In Plymouth To Close Permanently | WBUR News

It is already losing money - about $40,000,000 a year. It was shut down FIVE TIMES for emergencies in the past year, or so. So, there goes the theory that nuclear is "dependable".

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/20...qQO/story.html
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Old 08-28-2018, 02:10 PM   #2595 (permalink)
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More flooding in ... Madison WI:

https://weather.com/safety/floods/ne..._ven=wu_videos

Hawai'i got as much as 48.25" of rain in just three days.
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Old 08-28-2018, 02:24 PM   #2596 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilBlanchard View Post
The most expensive way to generate power is nuclear - this is why almost none are being built. Land based wind is the cheapest.
Hogwash. They aren't being built because of NIMBY and FUD due to the human tendency to be terrible at approaching risk in a rational way. If land based wind were cheaper, my utility would ask if I would like to pay 4 cents less per kWh for "green" energy rather than asking that I pay 4 cents more.

Decommissioning is factored into the price of nuclear plants before construction even begins. The extremely high upfront and decommissioning cost is meant to be amortized over the course of 40 years or more. Fuel and maintenance is extremely cheap beyond these 2 major expenses. The rising cost of nuclear has more to do with irrational fear and NIMBY hurdles than anything else. Storing "waste" isn't a problem, you just store it. The USA has tons of space to store a little fuel. Besides that, today's waste is tomorrow's fuel.

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Decommissioning the Pilgrim nuclear power plant in Plymouth MA will cost <b>$1,000,000,000 - $One Billion</b> and take (at least) about a decade. They said they will store the waste in New Mexico. But I think it will be staying on site in dry casks - that last only about 100 years. Who will pay in the long run?
That's 1 plant out of 440 in the world. I'm not up on why they want to decommision the plant, or why it's "losing" money. Normally once a plant is built, the cost is already sunk and you can only make money from there on out. CA wants to decommision a plant due to NIMBY, but it currently produces carbon free electricity at $0.027 /kWh. Somehow those idiots think they are better off building new natural gas plants at a higher cost, than simply continuing to use the plant that is already built.
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:11 PM   #2597 (permalink)
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It's National Stand in a Line Day

Hopefully my mail-in ballot wasn't intercepted. I would hate for a more informed voter vote for me.

Going through My Ballot — #azvotes: azcentral politics' 2018 Voters Guide it was interesting to see a familiar face from coroplast in the Phoenix area on my ballot--a friend from high school. The Arizona Republic sent each candidate a survey and one of the questions is: Do you agree with mainstream science that burning fossil fuels contributes to climate change, and do you feel it is the role of corporation commissioners to address that issue when regulating utilities?

Justin Olson: The role of the Commission is limited to its constitutional requirement to establish just and reasonable rates for public service corporations.

Tom Forese: Science is science. I have seen the science and I see the reasoning and the argument that science is making. There are many things that contribute to our environment and our climate. On a personal and moral level, I believe in taking all things into consideration when deciding a case, including the environmental impact. However, having said that, it is not the role of the Arizona Corporation Commissioners to set environmental policy. There are other agencies in Arizona who share that direct responsibility.

William "Bill" Mundell: Yes. The cost of solar, wind and other renewables has come down substantially in the last few years and in some cases is even cheaper than fossil fuel. It is the responsibility of the Commissioners to make sure that the utilities are generating electricity from the least expensive energy source possible. By increasing the use of solar, wind and other renewables, we will bring down the cost of electricity and also reduce CO2 emissions.
Arizona should be the Solar Capitol of the world.

Sandra Kennedy: Yes, and it should be addressed by the corporation commissioners.

Rodney Glassman: Like a great many things, burning fossil fuels likely contributes to climate change. Science, mainstream or otherwise, does not yet agree how much. Regardless, the Commission is not the appropriate venue for setting statewide energy policy. That remains the responsibility of the Legislature. The Commission's constitutional charge is to protect ratepayers while ensuring reliable, resilient, safe, and affordable public services. As tempting as it may be for elected Commissioners, some whom have demonstrated a desire for higher office, to expand the commissions role and be seen as being more active in certain areas, I do not believe the commission has the constitutional role to mandate or advocate and should instead remain focused on its constitutionally charged duties of protecting ratepayers pocketbooks while guaranteeing reliable, resilient, safe, and affordable public services from Arizona utilities.

James "Jim" O'Connor: All decisions of the commission regarding energy sources come with a cost. The costs factor into the rates customers pay for water and power. So yes, commissioners have a duty and responsibility to weigh-in on this subject.

Kiana Maria Sears
Burning fossil fuels does lead to climate change. This is a fact. And I also believe that the Corporation Commission has a responsibility to address this issue. Because we live in Arizona, there is no reason that solar and other renewable energy sources should not be utilized to create clean and sustainable energy. Utilizing renewable sources of energy means Arizona is also using clean energy. Aside from climate change itself, fossil fuels lead to pollution and the low air quality across Arizona. Corporations like APS are not going to make these changes on their own, which means the Corporation Commission must step in.

Eric Sloan: If you want to eliminate carbon emissions from the air, and that is a good goal to have, nuclear is the best source of fuel to do that. Arizona has a huge advantage by having the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station operating in Arizona for Arizonans. I will vote No on mandates and I will vote No on subsidies.
I will be vigilant to make sure that utilities are playing by the rules and meeting the clean air and clean water standards. This can happen by working with federal and local regulators to ensure utilities are not breaking the rules or the laws. Clean drinking water is the most important issue and the current commission has failed the people of Pinal County who are dealing with Johnson Utilities. I would immediately call for hearing and legal action for any company that did not meet the clean air and water standards.

Unfortunately, I am on my own regarding local elections. Should I vote for the friendly guy from Church for Justice of the Peace--or the other friendly guy from Church. There are zero candidates for court clerk. The previous clerk quit to run for JotP, but she gives out peanut butter kisses for Halloween.
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:14 PM   #2598 (permalink)
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You are talking about a plant that is decades old.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilBlanchard View Post

The most expensive way to generate power is nuclear - this is why almost none are being built. Land based wind is the cheapest. Sea based wind is more than land, but now with the 12MW turbines, the cost of sea based systems has come down quite a bit.

Decommissioning the Pilgrim nuclear power plant in Plymouth MA will cost <b>$1,000,000,000 - $One Billion</b> and take (at least) about a decade. They said they will store the waste in New Mexico. But I think it will be staying on site in dry casks - that last only about 100 years. Who will pay in the long run?

Entergy Agrees To Sell Plymouth Nuclear Plant To Handle Its Decommissioning | Bostonomix

43-Year-Old Pilgrim Nuclear Plant In Plymouth To Close Permanently | WBUR News

It is already losing money - about $40,000,000 a year. It was shut down FIVE TIMES for emergencies in the past year, or so. So, there goes the theory that nuclear is "dependable".

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/20...qQO/story.html
The problem with nuclear power plants is that new designs have not been supported and built.

It would be more truthful to compare these old plants to the solar and wind farms of 1960s technology. Where are those farms now? How much power did they produce in their lifetimes?
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:25 PM   #2599 (permalink)
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Weaponizable plutonium never enters in the economic equation (overtly). Is it too late to start over with Thorium?

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Unfortunately, I am on my own regarding local elections.
I'm sympathetic, but it's a little political for The Lounge for me.
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:27 PM   #2600 (permalink)
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