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Old 04-22-2019, 05:41 PM   #51 (permalink)
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The guy who made the aircrete shed used metal studs. The aircrete would have increased the strength, but he actually doubled up on studs, because he had one on each end of each presumably 16" slab, so where the slabs met, there were two back-to-back. I am not sure whether sheet metal conducts temperature better than a 2x4, but it seems like aircrete would attach better to metal studs since they have three sides.

One 2x4 costs $2.86, metal studs cost $4.84 when you buy 70+, but he doubled up, so the cost would be $9.68 compared to $2.86.

239% more.

I read some pages trying to convince people that metal studs were better, but it just seemed like their pros were cons. More expensive and weaker?!

The local Lowe's charges $2.86 for a 2x4x8, while a 2x6 is somehow $5.22.

A 2x8 is $5.48!

Home Depot charges the exact same.

R-13 insulation is $60.13 for 11 batts, or $5.47 each, while R-19 insulation is $50.82 for 9 batts, or $5.65 each. The only R-25 that I found was $50.15 for six batts, $8.36 each, and is unfaced, while I priced faced insulation for x4 and x6 walls.

So...
A 2x4 wall would be $2.86 per stud and $5.47 per batt, for a total of $..8.33.
A 2x6 wall would be $5.22 per stud and $5.65 per batt, for a total of $10.87.
A 2x8 wall would be $5.48 per stud and $8.36 per batt, for a total of $13.84.

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Old 04-22-2019, 06:21 PM   #52 (permalink)
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freebeard, I try to plan thoroughly, but I always miss important details. Yes, second shed in the yard, and insulated, because I want to use part for storage, and part for an office.

I had thought about adding onto the existing shed, but supposedly a separate aircrete building would be cheaper, although it does not seem nearly as cheap as the creator wanted us to think. As I mentioned to Shane, the metal studs actually cost almost 340% as much as 2x4s.

If I added onto the existing shed I would need to create a foundation. It is just sitting on cinder blocks and neither I nor whoever built the shed tried to level the ground. The ground and the shed slope forward. I would need redo the half of the roof adjacent to the addition.

What is a scab former? Google does not show anything useful.

Show Low is at 34.3515 N, so I wanted to approximate that angle the best that I could. Tan 34.3515 = .6835. I am planning on ten feet on the inside, but the outside would be another 5.25", due to one 2x4, and half of the one between the new part and the old one. .6835 * 125.25" = 85.6084" or 7'1 5/8"

I used fewer decimal places before and did not account for the width of the walls.

With 8' walls and the peak of the girder being over 7', I may need to adjust something, because my building may or may not be limited to 15'.

The regulation is poorly written.

Cos 34.3515 = .8256. 125.25" / .8256 = 151.7094" or 12' 7 11/16".

That leaves just over 4" for an overhang on the side.

I have watched infinitely more home shows than performed any actual work, why would I have ten-foot corners? Wouldn't I only have two corners because I am attaching to the existing shed?

Fifty linear feet would be the perimeters, but I do not understand your estimate of 82 linear feet of 2x4s.

Are you recommending pouring a 4x4 of concrete along the perimeter? If ten feet is stretching it, should I pour a 4x4 of concrete in the middle?

If I had a 4x4 every 6', the top plate is on-center, so I trim the girts to fit?

Six does not go into 10 or 15 very well. How would I insulate?

I started trying to figure out SketchUp, and how to diagram all of this, but I figured that I would need to redo nearly everything.

Thank you very much for your time and patience!
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Old 04-22-2019, 07:55 PM   #53 (permalink)
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I up against the learning curve of Blender 2.8. It's brutal. I finally decided to go with "I have in my hand an envelope". =)

Scab [verb] means to nail a reinforcing board onto another one. In that case a 2x4 nailed across the inside of 2 posts and a 2x8 on the outside leveled on top. Then you do a monolithic pour of the stem wall/riser and slab.

I only estimated for a perimeter foundation ring. With a dirt floor you roto-till it with an admixture of ox blood and then tamp it with a concrete vibrator. "Dirt" cheap.
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I like the bamboo tile roof All Darc showed. I'd look for the corrugated panels that they use on railroad car carriers (used). Boxcars are 9' 2" inside (?)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autorack
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Cinva-Ram is the original CEB design. You saw mention of stabilized vs no-stabilized bricks? I believe that has to do with adding Portland cement to the mixture. The pressure causes moisture in the mix to hydrate the cement for. a stronger product.
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Old 04-22-2019, 08:38 PM   #54 (permalink)
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There are a lot of videos of people who turned a railrood car into a office or even a compact home.



]

And even some double deck bus became a camp house :


Last edited by All Darc; 04-22-2019 at 08:49 PM..
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Old 04-23-2019, 12:26 AM   #55 (permalink)
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I think the stabilized ones are also supposed to withstand water better. So, you embed a 2x4 in the concrete, with a stud positioning it vertically, and then you mount a 2x8 to the embedded 2x4?

Why did you estimate 82 linear feet of 2x4s? Why are the 4x4s 10'?

I have seen many shipping container homes, but this is my first time seeing homes for boxcar children.
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Old 04-23-2019, 02:15 AM   #56 (permalink)
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I only wrote down the totals, it was 50 lineal (not board) feet of one length and 32 feet of another. 2 feet of the 4x4 goes into the ground.

Railroad cars and shipping containers are overbuilt for most purposes. How about the swap body?



Quote:
Swap bodies are typically more expensive than equivalent payload ISO containers. This is because the ISO containers used in Europe are typically manufactured in China, whereas swap bodies are made in Europe (central Europe and the UK). This extra cost is offset by the lighter weight of the body and increased cargo capacity, resulting in fuel savings during transport.
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Old 04-23-2019, 03:20 AM   #57 (permalink)
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Thank you for the diagram. How do you keep the concrete between the boards higher than the rest of it?

Here is a reefer box in New York. So, it is already insulated, but I doubt that I could use the diesel generator for my own purposes and run the A/C unit off A.C. $4,500: https://www.cassone-used.com/invento...=0&uc=imperial

Here is a 16' truck box in Phoenix for $1,950: https://www.commercialtrucktrader.co...SON-5001297735

I just wish, of all of the options they show, one included transport, but I am sure people usually have trucks before they purchase boxes.
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Old 04-23-2019, 02:02 PM   #58 (permalink)
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I started with an isometric view, but a sectional view was quicker. Maybe I'll try again in Krita instead of Photoshop. The top half of the 2x8 with the 2x4 and posts make a box. The result is a slab with the post let into the edge with a section of stem wall between the posts.

The girts span post-to-post roll insulation would be installed horizontally, you would need three with 2' rolls. If with a rammed earth floor, maybe 2x6s inside and out.

edit:
If you find a deal on a shipping container right down the street, there is this on Boing Boing:

boingboing.net/.../how-to-build-a-house-out-of-shipping containers
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Old 04-23-2019, 06:29 PM   #59 (permalink)
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That sounds like how I built the fence. Do you think I would be approved a permit to build with 6' girts?

In theory, I could find a relatively cheap box truck, but I would probably need to drive it up from the valley, use it to haul stuff to the dump, undo the U-bolts, set up the box in the back yard, and sell the truck.

That sounds like a weird solution!

I have been trying to price structural insulated panels, but while I find many sites for various manufacturers, I find very few places actually selling them.

This site says a 4.5-inch thick panel is R-16 and costs $162.56.

I would need eleven panels: $1,788.16. We are approaching aircrete territory, but I see fewer ways to mess up, and no theoretical catastrophic failures.

This place has 1.5-inch boards, 2", and 6.5-inch boards, but only have OSB on one side, although I could hang drywall on the inside. R-22.1, $123.95 each, and $1,363.45 for 11.

SIPs are supposed to be stronger than normal wooden frames, but Ray-core builds SIPs with normal wooden frames and claims that they are as little as half the cost of their competitors--but they do not advertise prices: https://raycore.com/sips-panels-cost-pricing/

They say a 3.5-inch wall is R-26.
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Old 04-23-2019, 10:20 PM   #60 (permalink)
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Have you seen this theory of the Pyramids?
https://www.livescience.com/1554-sur...ids-built.html

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